Tuesday, March 17, 2009

I can't go on/I'll go on

I went to the best yoga class of my life tonight. I thought I would die, but I lived, and after class, I still had negative, angry, judgmental thoughts about almost every person I passed, but the thoughts washed over me quicker than they normally do. Maybe, some day, I'll only have negative, angry, judgmental thoughts about half the people I see, and that will be an improvement.

I think yoga is kind of like Beckett: I can't go on/I'll go on. And also like long songs with dissonant middle sections where you're like, I'm gonna skip to the next track, I hate the middle part, but if you do get through the middle, then the beginning theme repeats itself, and it's softer or sweeter the second time, and it was worth the wait to hear it again.

Now I'm eating my favorite tomato soup and corn bread from Whole Foods, which only costs thirty-eight cents.

5 comments:

Eastern Cynic said...

A good middle eight is hard to come by. The Beatles were particularly good at them, except they sometimes put them at the front of the songs. Like in "Help!" which is rather relevant. Upins.

Eric Z. said...

The miracle in there is: how can that cost only 38 cents?

Leigh Stein said...

What is upins?

They charge for cornbread by the ounce, I guess, and you're right, it's miraculous.

Michael Northrop said...

St. Patrick's in NY is a tough day not to judge people, what with the millions training it in just to puke green beer at 6 pm. Maybe on a more subdued holiday you will condemn only half of the passersby. Arbor Day is April 24 this year.

Tortilla ex Machina said...

About the Beatles – one of the reasons that they were so good at middle eights (other than the fact that they were so good) was that, at least in the early days, they would trade off – you can see a difference in the style in the middle of the song. For example: WE CAN WORK IT OUT (John did the middle eight on that one – you can see that it is a little more of a lecture and less of a plea) even GETTING BETTER (John added the "can't get no worse" to Paul's "Getting better all the time.") What I found particularly interesting was when he would sing 'flat' in harmony – (like FOLLOW THE SUN) – George Martin, as a classical musician, must have cringed, but he knew the 'lads' were geniuses so, what the hey. I guess this doesn't have anything to do with Leigh right now – but I do feel her pain and feel the same way (walking in judgement) too much myself. And so – here's to the hope that she feels more Paul and less John as time goes on.

Crispy

PS HELP was one of John's favorites. He thought it was one of his truest songs. Wrote it completely by himself, as a slow ballad originally. OK. Enough. Basta. I can go on, but I shouldn't ...